Losing your hair in the typical male pattern (where your hairline starts receding before getting thinner at the crown and the temples) is very common. When these two areas meet, it leaves hair at the sides and the back – in a horseshoe pattern. Eventually some men may go completely bald, while others might keep their hair around the back and sides (although some choose to shave these areas off anyway ).
While stories about hats choking off follicles or long hair pulling on the roots may be more folklore, repeat hair trauma like tightly woven hair pulled back and consistent friction can potentially worsen or cause localized hair loss in some individuals. Individuals who pull their hair tightly back in a rubber band can develop a localized hair loss at the front of the scalp.
Other options include microneedling ($1,200 and up per treatment) and platelet-replacement therapy (also $1,200 and up per treatment), which are usually offered in conjunction. Your scalp will be numbed first so you don’t feel the pinpricks involved in microneedling. They promote hair regeneration by spurring wound healing, and platelet-replacement therapy involves injecting growth factors into those wounds. “Combination therapy typically works better than monotherapy and usually yields results after three monthly treatments,” says Sadick, and should be teamed with an at-home minoxidil treatment.
That’s where biotin supplements and other natural haircare compounds, such as castor oil or rosemary oil, can prove especially helpful. They give you the right amount of certain nutrients needed for taking great care of your hair every day. To learn more about effective natural hair growth treatment methods, check out our other well-researched articles (https://hairlossable.com/articles/) geared towards your specific needs. You’ll never regret experiencing the natural hair care difference when you smile at yourself in the mirror every morning! 

The pull test helps to evaluate diffuse scalp hair loss. Gentle traction is exerted on a group of hairs (about 40–60) on three different areas of the scalp. The number of extracted hairs is counted and examined under a microscope. Normally, fewer than three hairs per area should come out with each pull. If more than ten hairs are obtained, the pull test is considered positive.[27]
Tinea is the medical word for fungal infection, and capitis means head. Tinea capitis is fungal infection of the scalp that for the most part affects school-age children. Tinea capitis is more common in black African or African-American scalps. This condition is rare in healthy adults. Bald spots usually show broken-off hairs accompanied by a dermatitis. Oral antifungals can penetrate the hair roots and cure the infection, after which hair grows back. Sharing hats or combs and brushes may transmit tinea capitis.
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